As it's a new year, let's take a few moments to reflect on the 2014 vintage.

Wintertime, warm and dry...

After an autumn with no storms or significant rain, the 2014 winter proved to be exceptionally warm and dry. Not one morning of frost, nor one day of rain, springlike temperatures. The soils were so dry that it was not possible to carry out the usual end of winter ploughing.

Springtime, yet more dry weather

Budding took place at the end of March, but with a certain coyness... As the vines had not been exposed to winter, they had not really rested. The lack of water meant that there was nothing to encourage them to rouse themselves.... A light rain at the start of April at least allowed the soils to open a little, there were a few drops an May but nothing in June. By June 30 th the total rainfall in the last 9 months was less than 150mm and that would have consequences for the vines. The vine stocks have sprouted very little. Flowering was very irregular even across one c├ępage, the wood of the syrah bunches did not harden until June and the grapes had difficulty in forming bunches. To tell the truth, I thought we wouldn't be able to harvest this year.... And then summer arrived...

Summertime, a little rain to save the vintage

Summer, not too hot and studded with a few storms, allowed the grapes to achieve maturity. Normally the vine grows in springtime and accumulates enough energy to allow the grapes to grow in summer. This year the vines had to draw on their reserves and and make do with the little rainfall which did arrive.

Harvest time

Harvest began on August 25 th and finished on September 28th. Even if we had been spared from the heavy rains which had fallen elsewhere in the region, harvest would be difficult after the year's weather. To complete the story of the year ; given the lack of wood growth which had to be pruned this year, we will need at least two years for the vegetation to recover.

And in the vines...

In 2014 we planted more than 200 trees and shrubs around the vines (almond, elm, elder, pomegranate, Sainte Lucie cherry, dog rose, service, roses,....) many varieties which will gradually embellish the countryside and attract birds and insects. We also planted a hundred olive trees to complete the collection. If all goes well, we will be able to produce enough oil to be able to share it... In 2015, we will plant a parcel of Carignan Blanc grafted on root stock supplied by the Conservatory of the Aude Chamber of Agriculture. And, of course, we will continue to plant more trees...

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